Yakuza Kiwami Review

Yakuza Kiwami Review

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I loved Yakuza 0. It’s probably the best Yakuza game to date. It filled in the backstory of key characters like Majima and Nishikiyama by giving them more depth and nuance then I would have ever imagined. But as someone who started with Yakuza 2 and only experienced the first game through the included retrospectives, the game that started it all is a mystery to me.

Yakuza: Kiwami is a fine remake of the PlayStation 2 title from a gameplay and presentation perspective but I feel it’s a remaster from the story standpoint. Yakuza 0 placed its arm around me, showed me the sights around Kamurocho and introduced me to new friends. We sat around, had drinks, and took our time to soak in what this series has to offer. By comparison, Yakuza: Kiwami stumbled around for a bit and then sprinted towards the end. I felt like the game had a big story to tell but didn’t have enough time to tell it.

I knew key plot points, characters, and what happened to them but I didn’t realize that would be sufficient to move forward with the series. I discovered tidbits that colored certain characters in a slightly different light but none of it was earth shattering. Events certainly transpired but if I didn’t play Yakuza 0, I doubt I would have felt much sympathy for any of the characters involved in this game outside of Haruka.

Yakuza 0 built up Kiryu’s enemies throughout the game’s arch. It even built-up other characters that wouldn’t have made significant contributions until this game. But then there were folks like Jingu who were thrusted into the limelight and I’m supposed to conjure hatred for.

I didn’t delve into the side content like I did with Yakuza 0 because the idea of more pocket racing was just too daunting so soon after the deep dive I took with 0. What little side stuff I caught wind of failed to entertain like the ones found in 0 though. That’s not to say I wasn’t entertained by tidbit though. I got a kick out of seeing modern recreations of Yuya, Kazuki, and Detective Date. This trio of characters were among the first that I met in my very first Yakuza title, Yakuza 2.

It’s tough to make a direct prequel like Yakuza 0 without it completely overshadowing the game the game that comes after it but that’s what it did. Advances in technology and gameplay design are one thing but the lessons learned in story telling and presentation makes me wish Sega would go all in and commit to a full remake. It would give the likes of Yumi and Nishikiyama more screen time to breathe. A full on remake would also give the developers an opportunity to rethink Majima’s role without breaking continuity. I didn’t mind randomly seeing him pop up in Kamurocho to fight Kiryu but not 3 seconds after seeing him get stabbed in the gut by his own lackey. I think his forced inclusion to Kiwami may be the most egregious offense.

But for $39.99 CAD, it’s tough to argue against picking up Yakuza: Kiwami. It’s the best way to experience the game that started it all without digging up a PlayStation 2 copy. Just remember: for better or worse, despite the fresh coat of paint and refinements, the story is still faithful to the original. I have nostalgia for Yakuza 2 and knowing it will also receive a Kiwami treatment of its own, I’m wondering how I will receive it. I guess we’ll find out next year when I expect it to make its North American debut.

 

Verdict:
It was okay

Ratings Guide

Thanks to Sega for providing a copy of Yakuza Kiwami for review

Yakuza 0 Review

Yakuza 0 Review

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Yakuza 0 was the definitive Yakuza experience. It had everything I loved about the series and then some. The cultural touches, the wackiness and the over-the-top violence was all there with a fresh coat of current generation paint. I took a six year hiatus after finish Yakuza 4. I still loved the series but I always felt it was losing a bit of its identity the further it marched forward in the timeline. Yakuza, to me, was and will always be a late 80s to early 90s series. This prequel was right up my alley then.

Tackling a prequel isn’t easy. How can you tack on a meaningful story when you already know the major outcomes? How can you introduce characters that were never referenced before? It turns out there’s a lot to mine and flesh out in the Yakuza series because this was one hell of a drama.

Kiryu Kazama, Goro Majima, Akira Nishikiyama and many others would go onto become bigger players in subsequent games but they all got their start somewhere. There was a time when Nishikiyama and Kiryu were oath brothers and actually loved one another. Kiryu was just an up and coming yakuza member doing small time jobs like debt collections. Nishikiyama was still aspiring for bigger and better things and Goro Majima wasn’t as wacky as he eventually became yet.

The game has its gripping crime drama but it also shares the story of Japan in the late 1980s. Side stories offered insight into various areas including the temperature of the people and taxes, the weird nature of telephone clubs, the influx of big money, and some citizen’s love of American culture. Of course, they are side stories and thus you can ignore the bulk of it but they add a lot of flavor and texture to what makes this franchise great. It’s not unusual to find myself racing slot cars for hours and then find myself running away from murderous yakuza types.

Coming from Yakuza 4 and its four characters down to just two in Yakuza 0 may seem like a downgrade at first glance but I found the focus on two of the series’ mainstays gave the story strong direction. Four characters also offered four different playstyles giving each character slightly different spins on how to dish out brutal punishment. I was pleasantly surprised to discover that they shoved four playstyles into Kiryu and Goro giving a total of eight distinct playstyles to toy around with. They’re all viable options for the random throwdowns on the mean streets of Tokyo or Osaka but every so often, it behooved me to switch to a specific style — especially important against the likes of Mr. Shakedown.

Mr. Shakedown? Giant men who roam the streets of Tokyo or Osaka looking for Kiryu or Goro to beat up and steal money from. I wish these giants could be seen shaking down other NPCs. These men were the game’s trickiest opponents. They had the most health and hit the hardest. I eventually discovered It was primarily a test of patience. If I was too bold or too greedy, I was in a world of hurt but since money was so easy to come by, losing to Mr. Shakedown wasn’t the end of the world.

I love the ridiculous side content of this game. They varied in size and scope but they all fed into the atmosphere of the game. Some of it taught life lessons that wouldn’t be out of place in a Saturday morning cartoon. Others were long drawn out games within a game where I’m managing a hostess club or real estate development firm. A lot of it though, were genuinely funny.

I was introduced to host and hostess clubs through this series. I gleaned more and more nuggets of Japanese culture in subsequent games but it’s been a while since I learned something significant. In Yakuza 0, I was introduced to telephone clubs and the precarious dating situations that they present. Some of it is still relevant today and online dating scene.

Yakuza 0 is at its best when it’s imparting knowledge, makes me laugh, fills me with suspense, and entertains me with hard hitting action and drama. This prequel fills in the back story of many of the series characters and lays the groundwork for things to come. At the same time, they’ve opened up the idea of getting into the story of Shintaro Kazama and Masaru Sera and how they built their legacies. I also feel they ended Yakuza 0 with one of the sweetest endings in games let alone the series.

It’s been days since I wrapped up Yakuza 0. It took me a lot longer than I it would but that was because I was delving deeper and deeper into what this game had to offer. I still have a lot of side stories to complete but Nier: Automata was calling and I had to go. However, there were moments when I considered revisiting Kamurocho. I should wait though: the Yakuza: Kiwami is just around the corner.

Verdict:
I loved it

Ratings Guide

Valkyria Chronicles Remastered Review

Valkyria Chronicles Remastered Review

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It’s been seven years since I finished Valkyria Chronicles (I was late to the party and played it in 2009). Before Sega’s strategy role playing game, my experience with the genre was virtually non-existent. I ignored the flurry of SRPG titles from original PlayStation era and I never came into contact with the classic XCOMs and Syndicates of the PC world either.

I recall enjoying Valkyria Chronicles very much but it’s been so long that I don’t remember many specifics. I know the turn based and real time hybrid battle system was liberating and novel but I draw blanks whenever I think about the the WWII inspired story.

Playing through Valkyria Chronicles Remastered on the PlayStation 4 was revelatory; I was amazed how much this game got right and how similar it was to XCOM: Enemy Unknown. They both employed a strategic layer for upgrades, recruitment systems and cover based tactical gameplay.

Valkyria Chronicles differed in a number of areas though. For one, the soldiers weren’t generic fodder whom I can rename on a whim. Each recruit had their own quirks and personality and I would feel a tinge of remorse when certain ones died on the battlefield. I love Hershal’s non-chalance. I didn’t care for Noce though. His jealousy towards his superior officer, Lt. Welkin Gunther was too much. I just kept him around because he had other strong skills and was voiced by the same voice actor of Persona 3’s Akihiko.

Before I continue, I have to address the quality of the remastering. The game ran at a perfect 1080p60 and just as I suspected back in 2008, the CANVAS Engine aged beautifully. The only presentation blemishes were the pre-recorded in-engine cutscenes that reminded what the PlayStation 3 version of the game actually looked like. It turns out I was a lot more forgiving with aliasing back then.

I forgot how cutscene heavy this game was. Thankfully they were both skippable and charming. I actually found them more endearing now than before; I even got a little misty eyed in the end. My only complaint was the inability to auto-play through the lines of dialog. They’re all voiced so there’s no reason to have me button through them.

With experience comes confidence and with the likes of XCOM and Fire Emblem under my belt, I found myself attacking Valkyria Chronicles missions head on. I was no longer turtling and relying on Snipers to pick off enemies. I rushed Shock Troopers more often and used defensive Orders to buff Scouts to capture forward field bases. I was also more mindful of spacing and cover this time around as well. As a result I was coming away with higher mission rankings; I traded D’s for B’s and even saw some A’s this time around.

Better mission performances resulted in more resources to improve my squad which enabled me to continue my more aggressive style of play. I could have replayed Skirmish missions for more resources but it wasn’t necessary by the latter half of the game. I wasn’t able to develop every branch of weaponry but I had more than enough to fulfil my selections.

Another revelation which manifested itself due to personal experience was how well Valkyria Chronicles handled various topics and themes common to World War II media. Prejudice, political strife and the tribulations of war were all touched upon. Valkyria Chronicles wasn’t retelling World War II but it leveraged it to great effect. Characters grew as the war progressed and became hardened soldiers with a better understanding of themselves and the world around them, albeit through an anime lens.

Valkyria Chronicles was wonderful then and it’s just as wonderful now. Fans looking to revisit the game can do no wrong with this remaster; it’s just as I remembered it in my mind. For those who have never played it, they’re in for a unique experience that I’ve yet to see replicated. It treads familiar territory with World War II but it executes it better than most “authentic” World War II games that I’ve played. Just look past the overly busty silver haired woman wielding a lance.

Verdict:
I love it

Ratings Guide

Thanks to Sega for providing me a review copy of Valkyria Chronicles Remastered.

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